Updates

We’re cracking down on Texas’ worst polluters.

Our Texas Clean Air Project won landmark settlements on behalf of Environment Texas members against Shell Oil in 2009 and Chevron Phillips in 2010, after the companies agreed to halt illegal emissions and pay millions in fines. Now, as ExxonMobil releases millions of pounds in excess pollution at its Baytown facility, we’re using the same legal strategy to demand compliance with the law.

Blog Post

Biggest bike lanes investment in Austin history | Luke Metzger

Last month, the Austin City Council tentatively approved a $720 million mobility bond to invest in Austin’s transportation infrastructure. The bond includes $500 million for corridor improvement projects and $120 million for road, sidewalk, bike and transit infrastructure. Bike Austin has called the $20 million reserved for protected bike lanes and $55 million for sidewalks the biggest investment in bike and pedestrian projects in Austin’s history.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Tyson among top water polluters in Texas

HOUSTON – Tyson Foods, one of the world’s largest meat and poultry producers, generates the most animal manure of major companies surveyed nationwide, a new report said today. The Environment Texas Research & Policy Center study documented pollution from Tyson and four other major agriculture conglomerates, responsible for 44 percent of the pork, chicken, and beef produced in the U.S.

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Corporate Agribusiness and the Fouling of America’s Waterways

Pollution from agribusiness is responsible for some of America’s most intractable water quality problems – including the “dead zones” in the Chesapeake Bay, the Gulf of Mexico and Lake Erie, and the pollution of countless streams and lakes with nutrients, bacteria, sediment and pesticides. Today’s agribusiness practices – from the  concentration of thousands of animals and their waste in small feedlots to the massive planting of chemical-intensive crops such as corn – make water pollution from agribusiness both much more likely and much more dangerous.

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Blog Post

Community Solar Burns Bright in Texas Sun | Luke Metzger

Though solar power is really beginning to take off in Texas, it can still be challenging for some residential homeowners and renters to obtain.  Some locations are not permitted to install solar panels, renters rarely have any say in the matter, many families and individuals cannot afford the up-front costs of going solar, and other sites are just not fit to harvest energy (e.g. there is a lot of tree shade on the property).  Community solar power is growing just in time to save the day.  In areas all across Texas, solar companies are investing in off-site locations to build solar farms for residents restricted from solar energy. 

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Blog Post

El Paso Rate Change Proposal Discriminates Against Solar Users | Luke Metzger

On May 19th, the PUCT sent El Paso Electric’s bid to increase utility rates back down to administrative law judges after determining that El Paso Electric did not provide adequate notice of their rate increase to residential solar customers under Texas law. Earlier this year, El Paso Electric (EPE) and the City of El Paso had reached a settlement on a $37 million rate increase to fund the public utility’s infrastructure improvements. EPE executives claim this deal represents the best interests of the utility and its customers, but some customers are being hit harder than others. 

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