Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

News Release | Environment Texas

Solar energy grows 62% in Austin in 2014

AUSTIN – Austin experienced explosive growth in distributed solar energy installations in 2014, growing from 13 megawatts (MW) in 2013 to 21 MW by the end of 2014, an increase of 62%. Solar panels were installed on hundreds of homes, schools and businesses, including at Huston Tillotson University, AISD’s new Performing Arts Center, Goodwill Industries and Howdy Honda.  

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News Release | Environment Texas

Solar energy grows 22% in Houston in 2014

AUSTIN – Houston experienced significant growth in solar energy installations in 2014, growing from approximately 4 megawatts (MW) in 2013 to 5 MW by the end of 2014, an increase of 22%. “Cities can be big stars in our transition to clean energy,” said Luke Metzger, Director of Environment Texas. “We know that Houston has the potential to be among them.”

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Shining Cities

The use of solar power is expanding rapidly across the United States. By the end of 2014, the United States had 20,500 megawatts (MW) of cumulative solar electric capacity, enough to power four million average U.S. homes.

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News Release | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

New website evaluates environmental impact of projects in State Water Plan

AUSTIN – Environment Texas Research and Policy Center launched a new website today designed to help educate Texans about the environmental impacts of projects in the State Water Plan. The interactive website – www.OurTexasWater.org - allows Texans to view a map of the state and learn about highlighted projects in their community. The new website comes as the Texas Water Development Board considers the first round of applications for funding from the new water infrastructure fund approved by voters in November 2013. 

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Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Polluting Politics

Year after year, polls show that more Americans are concerned with the pollution and quality of our waterways more than any other environmental issue. And after toxins in Lake Erie left 400,000 Toledo, OH residents unable to drink the water coming out of their taps last August, the need to protect our waterways is clear and present.

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