Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

Blog Post

Opposition grows to TX official serving on EPA clean air panel | Luke Metzger

Today, seven of Texas' leading air quality advocates wrote the EPA in opposition to the Texas state toxicologist serving on a key federal clean air panel. The group charges Dr. Michael Honeycutt with “an appearance of a loss of impartiality,” disqualifying him from serving on the EPA's Clean Air Science Advisory Committee (CASAC). CASAC plays a powerful role in setting science-based federal policy on air quality.

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Meet our Summer 2015 Intern Team! | Luke Metzger

Every semester, we recruit and train college students to learn the skills of environmental advocacy and work alongside our staff to win real results for Texas' air, land and water. We've got a great group working with us this summer - read all about them below!

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Sine Die | Luke Metzger

Yesterday, on the last day of session (known as "Sine Die"), the 84th Legislature gavelled to a close. Congressman Joaquin Castro called it "perhaps the worst legislative session in Texas history" and the Texas League of Conservation Voters called it a "disaster for the environment, public health, and local control." It's true, it was a pretty rough session for the environment. The Legislature ended the rights of cities to ban or even regulate fracking unless it's deemed "commercially reasonable" (yeah, nobody really knows what that means). They also made it harder for cities to sue big polluters who break the law and harder for citizens to challenge companies seeking permits to pollute near their communities. A rebate program to help Texans buy electric cars was allowed to expire.

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Without action, Texas will keep bearing warming's brunt

A generation ago, many people thought of global warming as something that would happen "someday, somewhere." As it turns out, "someday" is now, "somewhere" is here it's really something.

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Coal permits are protested

A watchdog group says Texas’ environmental agency, working with electric companies, violated the federal Clean Air Act by increasing allowable power plant emissions without telling the public or the EPA.

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