Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

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Oil Water Wildcatters

...the alternatives to recycling remain cheaper: Shipping in freshwater or drilling water wells on a lease, then getting rid of the water that comes out of the well by trucking it away and burying it under rock in a disposal well.  In the Permian Basin, that’s about 9 billion barrels of water a year.  In Texas there are about 50,000 disposal wells, according to the Railroad Commission. And most of those are in the Permian Basin, Nicot said, making it cheaper to get rid of waste water than other the other major oil and gas regions in Texas.

Incentives to oil and gas companies that would offset the added costs of recycling water failed to gain legislative approval in the most recent legislative session and others before it. Environmental groups including Environment Texas have argued that the Railroad Commission should require recycling of waste water and track where it’s stored.

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Will this $2 billion save water supply?

The drought is so bad, the Lower Colorado River Authority recently proposed taking the unprecedented step of curtailing flows of water in the Colorado River intended for Matagorda Bay — water critical for protecting endangered sea turtles and the seafood industry. This shortsighted and dangerous move was thankfully reversed after recent rains alleviated some of the strain on our water supply. But it underscores how critical it is that we move toward a sustainable water future — and soon.

Proposition 6 is one important step towards that future.

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Video Blog

VIDEO: Vote YES on Prop 6

Watch this short animated video and see why you should vote YES on Nov. 5 to approve Prop 6, a historic chance to combat the drought and make an investment in water conservation. 

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Water Debate: Nine statewide propositions up for November vote

After provoking a contentious debate in the state Legislature earlier this year, an initiative to help drought-ridden Texas meet its water needs for the next half-century will now go to the voters with a strong push from Gov. Rick Perry and broad support among Metroplex business leaders.
Proposition 6 is one of nine constitutional amendments facing a final decision by Texas voters in the Nov. 5 election. Early voting is slated to begin Monday, Oct. 22 and will extend through Nov. 1.

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Funding for a flood of water projects

The money that could be leveraged from Proposition 6 — the water improvements measure on the November ballot — would help fund big and small projects across the state, from irrigation systems in rural counties to water storage plans and the completion of a desalinization plant in southern Bexar County.

If approved, the proposition will use $2 billion from the state's rainy day fund to leverage $30 million in a revolving loan account for water projects.

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