Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

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South Texas economic hopes hitched to SpaceX

Noise pollution and contamination from the chemicals sprayed during rocket launches are among the issues to consider, Metzger said. Ocelots, a threatened leopard species, face the greatest risks, he said. The animals are already vulnerable to being run over by cars, and the heavy traffic of site construction would pose an even greater threat to the spotted felines.

“An area surrounded by state parks is not appropriate for industrial activity,” Metzger said. “When Texas has such little public land — less than 5 percent is publicly protected as state parks — we need to be taking the best care of the parks we do have.”

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Blog Post

What the Proposed EPA Limits on Carbon Pollution mean for Texas | Luke Metzger

On Monday, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced proposed limits on carbon pollution from existing power plants. They require the energy sector to reduce its carbon pollution by 30 percent from the 2005 level by 2030, effectively cutting 730 million metric tons of carbon pollution. The Clean Power Plan sets targets for each state and allows states to develop their own plans to reach the required reductions.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Texas elected officials applaud EPA’s first-ever proposed limits on carbon pollution from power plants

AUSTIN – Today, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the first-ever, federal limits on carbon pollution from power plants, the largest single source of global warming pollution in America.  A group of elected officials from across Texas enthusiastically applauded the proposed limits, which once finalized will be the largest step the U.S. has taken to combat global warming.

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News Release | Environment Texas

Environment Texas criticizes Railroad Commission decision on fracking waste

AUSTIN - Today, the Railroad Commision rejected the Gonzales County Underground Water Conservation District's attempt to intervene in a permit application by Marathon Oil to inject fracking waste underground near the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer. Environment Texas Director Luke Metzger released the following statement:

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News Release | Environment Texas

30 Local Elected Officials Join 600 Nationally, Tell President Obama: Act on Climate

AUSTIN – President Obama today received a letter signed by 30 Texas elected officials, including El Paso County Judge Veronica Escobar and Houston Senators Rodney Ellis and Sylvia Garcia, thanking him for his leadership on addressing climate change and pledging their support as local partners in implementing carbon pollution standards for power plants and other key components of the president’s Climate Action Plan. In total, more than 600 local elected officials from across the U.S. signed the letter.

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