Updates

We stopped 20 state parks from closing

After devastating budget cuts in 2011, this spring, the Legislature restored funding for state and local parks. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department had warned that 20 state parks would have to close without additional funds. But after a public outcry—including thousands of petition signatures from Environment Texas members—the Legislature boosted funding by $62 million. That's enough to keep all our state parks open, make critical repairs, replant trees destroyed by wildfire at Bastrop State Park, and to give grants to cities to build new parks, ball fields and playgrounds.

Headline

City of Houston to buy loads of renewable energy

The city of Houston has agreed to purchase half its electricity from renewable sources. "From promoting electric vehicles to adopting some of the strongest energy efficiency standards in the country, Houston is a rising star among clean energy cities," said Luke Metzger, director of Environment Texas.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Texas

Statement on Houston renewable energy purchase

AUSTIN – Today, Houston Mayor Annise Parker announced an agreement  to increase the city’s purchase of renewable energy to cover half of municipal electric demand. The purchase makes Houston the largest purchaser of renewable energy in the nation.

> Keep Reading
Headline

Plastic bag study debunked

The truth is that Dallas uses millions of plastic grocery bags every year. They trash the Trinity River, city parks and streets.

Nothing we use for just five minutes should trash Dallas' cityscape.

> Keep Reading
News Release | Environment Texas

Gov. Perry signs water conservation bills

AUSTIN – Yesterday, Gov. Perry signed a package of bills designed to help conserve water amid one of Texas’ worst droughts. Environment Texas Director Luke Metzger released the following statement:

> Keep Reading
Headline

Perry helps water conservation

Texas is in a water crisis caused by drought and made worse by wasteful water use.

A recent Environment Texas Research and Policy Center report found that increasing the use of drought-tolerant plants in landscaping instead of traditional lawns could reduce withdrawals by 14 billion gallons by 2020, or as much as 240.000 Texans would use in a vear.

> Keep Reading

Pages