Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Raw Sewage Released by Hurricane Harvey

Reports indicate that flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey spilled at least 31 million gallons of raw sewage in Texas, but likely spilled far more.1 That’s the equivalent of every person in Houston flushing a toilet seven times.* This pollution threatens human health.

Report | Environment Texas Research and Policy Center

Texas Stormwater Scorecard

Rain is one of Texas’s greatest resources, but it also causes some of our most serious problems. Too much produces flooding and erosion, too little produces droughts and aquifer depletion, and dirty runoff produces water pollution. These problems are becoming worse as more of the state’s land is covered with buildings and roads that prevent rain from soaking into the ground where it falls. That’s why more Texans are using building and landscaping features that can retain and reuse stormwater onsite. These features include rain gardens, green roofs, permeable pavement, and rain cisterns, and are known as Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) and Low Impact Development (LID).

Report | Environment Texas

Get the Lead Out

Our children need safe drinking water – especially at school where they go to learn and play each day.  Unfortunately, lead is contaminating drinking water at schools and pre-schools across the country.  As our report shows, states are so far failing to make the grade when it comes to keeping lead out of drinking water at school.  Instead of waiting for more testing, we need to proactively remove the lead pipes and plumbing at the root of this toxic hazard for our children.